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Epilepsy affects 50 million people around the world. In around 50% of patients, the root cause of the condition is unknown. What if you could raise awareness of epilepsy and help to fund research simply by paying sartorial homage to the colour purple on Monday 26th March? Millions of others will be.

Don your boysenberry blouse and purple pants...

Chances are you haven’t heard of 18-year-old Cassidy Megan. But she’s responsible for starting a global movement that refuses to stop gathering momentum. Back in 2008 Cassidy - then aged nine and coming to terms with her recent epilepsy diagnosis - wanted to find a way to raise awareness of epilepsy, bust the myths associated with the condition and make sure others living with epilepsy knew they weren’t alone. Her simple answer was to allocate 26th March as Purple Day: a day when as many people as possible would show support by wearing purple.

Today hundreds of thousands of people in over 100 countries celebrate Purple Day. The event encompasses tens of thousands of schools, workplaces and communities right across the globe - from Argentina to Zambia. So dig out your lavender leggings, boysenberry blouse and mauve mascara. Don your purple pants, violet vest and periwinkle winklepickers. Just grab something purple and put it on. It really is that simple - and you’ll be showing support for a fantastic cause.

Why does it matter?

Epilepsy affects 50 million people around the world. That’s around 1% of the global population. In around 50% of patients, the root cause of the condition is unknown. It’s a scary thought. But medical understanding about the electrical processes that lead to seizures is constantly progressing. And research is finding new ways to improve the medications that help to control epilepsy.

Epilepsy can affect anyone - young or old. Purple Day sends out a powerful message that those living with what can be a very scary condition are not alone. It unites epilepsy organisations from all over the globe. And it raises awareness of epilepsy - in turn helping to boost funds to progress research.

What if you don’t want to wear something purple?

We’re not buying the line about purple not being your colour. What’s that? You genuinely don’t have any purple in your wardrobe? You don’t have time to go out and buy a heather halter neck or mauve mankini? Okay, okay. There are other ways you can show support for Purple Day.

Join one of the events that are taking place across the globe. Organise an event of your own - there’s inspiration here, did someone say cake? Add a purple ribbon to your Twitter or Facebook account. Or simply donate to an epilepsy charity - £20 is purple, right? It’s easy to do nothing. But it’s not hard to do something.

Where does travel insurance come in to it?

Everyone loves going on holiday. But getting travel insurance when you’re living with epilepsy can be tough. Many insurers may refuse to cover you. Others may quote impossibly high premiums. At World First we use underwriters that have worked hard to understand the challenges of people living with epilepsy. We offer comprehensive, considered policies and make getting cover more straightforward. That’s important. Because the unpredictable nature of epilepsy makes it really important to have travel cover you can count on.

What next?

You can find out more about our epilepsy travel insurance at World-First.co.uk. Alternatively feel free to call our customer service team on 0345 90 80 161 or email info@world-first.co.uk. For more information on Purple Day visit www.purpleday.org.

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